Citizen Score

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One goal of the JacksonHeights.nyc Initiative is to facilitate connection with our neighbors to identify needs and opportunities and facilitate collaboration. With a recording and publishing medium like a wiki, we run the risk of invading personal privacy and turning into a "citizen score" ranking system. We explore that on this page.

China's Citizen Scores[edit]

See the below clip from an article on the ACLU's website. NOTE this criticism that says, in essence, that the article's author has gotten ahead of himself by linking programs with different goals, and that the dire scenario presented might be incorrect.

But for purposes of improving our lives and our neighborhood, do we want a citizen or civic score about who's been naughty and who's been nice? Such a system will make it easier to locate collaborators. But would such a score hinder or help other critical factors such as creating trust?

From the ACLU article:

China is launching a comprehensive “credit score” system, and the more I learn about it, the more nightmarish it seems. China appears to be leveraging all the tools of the information age—electronic purchasing data, social networks, algorithmic sorting—to construct the ultimate tool of social control. It is, as one commentator put it, “authoritarianism, gamified.” Read this piece for the full flavor—it will make your head spin. If that and the little other reporting I’ve seen is accurate, the basics are this:

  • Everybody is measured by a score between 350 and 950, which is linked to their national identity card. While currently supposedly voluntary, the government has announced that it will be mandatory by 2020.
  • The system is run by two companies, Alibaba and Tencent, which run all the social networks in China and therefore have access to a vast amount of data about people’s social ties and activities and what they say.
  • In addition to measuring your ability to pay, as in the United States, the scores serve as a measure of political compliance. Among the things that will hurt a citizen’s score are posting political opinions without prior permission, or posting information that the regime does not like, such as about the Tienanmen Square massacre that the government carried out to hold on to power, or the Shanghai stock market collapse.
  • It will hurt your score not only if you do these things, but if any of your friends do them. Imagine the social pressure against disobedience or dissent that this will create.
  • Anybody can check anyone else’s score online. Among other things, this lets people find out which of their friends may be hurting their scores.
  • Also used to calculate scores is information about hobbies, lifestyle, and shopping. Buying certain goods will improve your score, while others (such as video games) will lower it.
  • Those with higher scores are rewarded with concrete benefits. Those who reach 700, for example, get easy access to a Singapore travel permit, while those who hit 750 get an even more valued visa.
  • Sadly, many Chinese appear to be embracing the score as a measure of social worth, with almost 100,000 people bragging about their scores on the Chinese equivalent of Twitter.

Related Wiki Pages[edit]

External Links[edit]